Are Masks Really Killing Americans? What about the Vaccine?


  • The United States is devided when it comes how necessary it is to protect citizens from CORONA Virus.
  • US States that think wearing a mask is limiting human rights include include: Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | Colorado | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | New Hampshire | New Jersey | North Carolina | North Dakota | Northern Mariana Islands | Ohio | Oklahoma | Pennsylvania | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming
  • US STATES that believe wearing a mask is protecting is citizens and mandating is not a limitation of human rights include American Samoa | California | Connecticut | District of Columbia | Guam | Hawaii | Illinois | Louisiana | Nevada | New Mexico | New York | Oregon | Puerto Rico | Rhode Island | U.S. Virgin Islands | Virginia | Washington

An N95 mask is a type of respirator. In January the World Tourism Network discussed in its rebuilding.travel on what masks are killing Americans.

The risks of SARS-CoV-2 infection in fully vaccinated people cannot be completely eliminated where community transmission of the virus is widespread. Vaccinated people could potentially still become infected and spread the virus to others.


The truth about the Vaccine?

  • COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.
  • Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines under the most intense safety monitoring in U.S. history.

Before the middle of the last century, diseases like whooping cough, polio, measles, Haemophilus influenzae, and rubella struck hundreds of thousands of infants, children, and adults in the U.S. Thousands died every year from them. As vaccines were developed and became widely used, rates of these diseases declined until today most of them are nearly gone from our country.

  • Nearly everyone in the U.S. got measles before there was a vaccine, and hundreds died from it each year. Today, most doctors have never seen a case of measles.
  • More than 15,000 Americans died from diphtheria in 1921, before there was a vaccine. Only two cases of diphtheria have been reported to CDC between 2004 and 2014.
  • An epidemic of rubella (German measles) in 1964-65 infected 12½ million Americans, killed 2,000 babies, and caused 11,000 miscarriages. Since 2012, 15 cases of rubella were reported to CDC.

Given successes like these, it might seem reasonable to ask, “Why should we keep vaccinating against diseases that we will probably never see?” Here is why:

Vaccines don’t just protect yourself:

Most vaccine-preventable diseases are spread from person to person. If one person in a community gets an infectious disease, he can spread it to others who are not immune. But a person who is immune to a disease because she has been vaccinated can’t get that disease and can’t spread it to others. The more people who are vaccinated, the fewer opportunities a disease has to spread.

If one or two cases of disease are introduced into a community where most people are not vaccinated, outbreaks will occur. In 2013, for example, several measles outbreaks occurred around the country, including large outbreaks in New York City and Texas – mainly among groups with low vaccination rates. If vaccination rates dropped to low levels nationally, diseases could become as common as they were before vaccines.


Wearing a mask was agreement around the globe, the discussion was on the type of the mask.

Today the type of mask seems to make no difference in the United States. The discussion is on wearing a mask at all.

This discussion is taken place in the country with the highest increase in new COVID-19 infections, the United States of America.


In total, the United States had 3,364,700 coronavirus cases as of yesterday. Yesterday also 155,297 new COVID-19 infections were recorded with 769 new deaths. A total of 637,181 US residents died on COVID-19. Based on population the US. is number 14 in the world with higher numbers only in Luxembourg, Georgia, Aruba, Slovenia, St. Barth, Maldives, San Marino, Bahrain, Gibraltar, Czech Republic, Montenegro, Seychelles, and Andorra. Currently, 6,597,427 US citizens have active COVID19 cases and 19,474 are in serious condition in hospitals fighting to survive.

Wearing a mask will protect those around you from infection. COVID-19 is spread from person to person by respiratory droplets, which are largely projected when you cough, sneeze, talk and sing. 

The United States of America is now the Divided States of America.


Here is a summary of States requiring the wearing of protective masks, and those that think they can put citizens in harm’s way.

Mask or no mask listed by US States:

Alabama: No State Mandate

Gov. Kay Ivey initiated a statewide mask mandate effective July 16, 2020, ordering that masks should be worn in the state when within 6 feet of a member of another household in public indoor spaces, while using transportation services or in outdoor public spaces with gatherings of 10 or more people. Gov. Ivey let the mandate expire on April 9, although she encouraged mask wearing after the mandate ends.


Alaska: No State Mandate

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services encourages mask wearing anytime social distancing is challenging, but no official mandate at the state level is in place.

American Samoa: Mandate in Place

Effective Feb. 2, Gov. Lemanu P. S. Mauga initiated a mask mandate for the territory, ordering individuals to wear face coverings inside any public building and while using public transportation. The group of islands in the Pacific Ocean that make up the territory has seen zero cases of COVID-19, according to the World Health Organization, and a code system has since been established in the territory ranging from blue to red, requiring that masks be worn when under a code yellow or red. The territory is currently in code blue, the least restrictive.

Arizona: No State Mandate

On Nov. 19, 2020, the Arizona Department of Health Services ordered that all schools throughout the state require masks to be worn on school campuses, on school buses and at any school-associated activities. Some businesses also have mask mandates in place, and some cities and counties have their own mandates, but a statewide mandate has not been instituted for Arizona outside of its schools. Gov. Doug Ducey has since rescinded all local mask mandates, and banned mask mandates implementation in schools. After the CDC announced its mandate reversal on July 27 and recommended masks be worn in schools, Ducey declared that Arizona will continue to disallow mask mandates in schools.

Arkansas: No State Mandate

Since July 20, 2020, a mask mandate was in place in the state, requiring that individuals comply with face-covering guidelines when exposed to members of other households where a distance of 6 feet could not be maintained. Gov. Asa Hutchinson lifted the state’s mask mandate on March 30, although he encouraged people to be courteous of others and respect the decisions of businesses going forward. In April, Hutchinson signed legislation banning mask mandates by local or state governments and schools.

California: State Mandate in Place

Gov. Gavin Newsom initiated a mask mandate for Californians on June 18, 2020, which was later updated to order face coverings be worn whenever individuals are outside of the home. Newsom in April 2021 announced that the state would align with the CDC’s outdoor masking recommendations, saying that those who are fully vaccinated do not need to wear a mask outdoors unless they are in a large crowd. On June 15, 2021, California’s mask mandate aligned with the CDC’s latest mask guidance for vaccinated individuals, allowing those who are vaccinated to forgo wearing a mask in most settings. But in the state’s most populous county, Los Angeles County, the mask mandate returned July 18, 2021, for everyone while indoors, regardless of vaccination status.

Colorado: No State Mandate

Since July 20, 2020, individuals in the state have been required to wear a mask in indoor, public spaces and when using or waiting to use public transportation. The mandate makes exceptions for those 10 years and under and those with certain medical conditions. Gov. Jared Polis in April relaxed indoor mask requirements for some counties that fall under level-green restrictions based on low coronavirus transmission rates. On May 2, Polis announced that he amended the state’s mask mandate to allow groups of 10 or more people to gather indoors without masks if 80% or more of those in attendance are vaccinated. On May 14, Polis announced an end to the statewide mask mandate, shifting from a requirement to a suggestion, after the CDC’s latest guidance for those who are vaccinated. Masks are still required in some settings, including in schools and on public transportation.

Connecticut: State Mandate in Place

Gov. Ned Lamont ordered starting April 20, 2020, that all individuals in the state must wear a mask or face covering if they come within 6 feet of a non-household member, and when using public transportation. Since September, individuals may be fined if they do not comply with the mask mandate. On May 19, 2021, the mandate was limited only to indoor areas, and those who are vaccinated will no longer be required to wear masks indoors. Children under 2 years of age are exempt from the mandate, as are those with certain medical conditions.

Delaware: No State Mandate

A mask mandate was in place in the state starting April 28, 2020, where individuals were required to wear face coverings when using public transportation, while at a business and in outdoor spaces where maintaining a distance of 6 feet from non-household members is not possible. Gov. John Carney announced that effective Dec. 14, a universal mask mandate would be initiated, requiring all individuals to wear a face covering anytime they are indoors with a non-household member. On May 21, the statewide mandate was lifted, and Delawareans are now encouraged to follow outdoor and indoor masking guidance as outlined by the CDC, Carney announced.

District of Columbia: Mandate in Place

Mayor Muriel Bowser initiated a mask mandate on July 22, 2020, stipulating that all individuals must wear a mask at businesses, in common areas of apartments, and when maintaining a distance of 6 feet is not possible outdoors. The order follows a May 2020 mandate requiring face coverings in essential business and during essential travel when the District was under a stay-at-home order. The order makes exceptions for children 2 years and younger, and individuals with certain medical conditions. On April 30, 2021, Bowser signed an executive order that allows people who are vaccinated to gather outdoors in small groups without masks, or with unvaccinated people who are wearing masks. People who are vaccinated may also get together indoors with other vaccinated individuals in private settings without masks. As of May 17, individuals who are fully vaccinated only need to wear masks in places where it is required, including health care settings, schools, at businesses where masks are mandatory and on public transportation. After the CDC reversed its mask guidance for vaccinated individuals, Mayor Muriel Bowser announced that the mask mandate would return for everyone while indoors, regardless of vaccination status, effective July 31.

Florida: No State Mandate

Although city and county-level mandates exist, Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended all fines and penalties associated with not adhering to COVID-19-related restrictions on Sept. 25, 2020, hindering local leaders from enforcing their mandates. In May, DeSantis signed legislation ceasing all local COVID-19 restrictions, including local mask mandates.

Georgia: No State Mandate

According to Gov. Brian Kemp, face coverings are strongly encouraged outside of individuals’ homes, but not required. An Aug. 15, 2020, order allows counties to call for a mask mandate if they meet a certain number of COVID-19 cases per 100,00 people, and some cities, such as Atlanta, have required masks in public.

Guam: Mandate in Place

The territory’s mask mandate orders individuals to wear masks “when congregating with persons not from the same household.” The Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services also ordered a system of fines and penalties for violating the mask directive.

Hawaii: State Mandate in Place

Until Nov. 16, 2020, the state had multiple mask mandates, dictated by county governments. Gov. David Ige instituted a statewide mandate for all individuals 5 years and older, excluding those with certain medical conditions. On May 25, Ige announced that the state’s outdoor mask mandate would lift, effective immediately, but masks are still required indoors.

Idaho: No State Mandate

On Nov. 19, 2020, five counties in Northern Idaho instituted a mask mandate, requiring masks to be worn when social distancing cannot occur. There is no mandate at the state level, though masks have been encouraged. On May 27, while Gov. Brad Little was out of state, Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin issued an executive order banning mask mandates in the state, prohibiting the state or its political subdivisions, such as public schools, from implementing their own mandates.

Illinois: State Mandate in Place

Gov. J.B. Pritzker put a mask mandate into place effective May 1, 2020, requiring that individuals in the state wear a face covering in public indoor spaces, and when expecting to come into contact with non-household members within 6 feet. Children 2 years and under are exempt from the mandate, as are individuals with certain medical conditions. On May 17, 2021, Pritzker aligned the state’s mask mandate with CDC guidelines, allowing those who are vaccinated to go without masks in most situations. On July 27, the state adopted the CDC’s latest guidance, recommending that people once again wear masks indoors, regardless of vaccination status, in areas where COVID-19 is surging. On Aug. 4, Pritzker introduced a mask mandate for all students in schools, regardless of vaccination status.

Indiana: No State Mandate

Since July 27, 2020, individuals were required to wear a mask or face covering in the state when visiting public indoor spaces and when unable to maintain a 6-foot distance from non-household members while outdoors. Gov. Eric Holcomb let the mandate expire on April 6, and a mask advisory now takes its place, recommending but not requiring that masks be worn. Masks are still required in government buildings, at COVID-19 testing and vaccination sites and at K-12 schools.

Iowa: No State Mandate

Between Nov. 17 and Feb. 6, a mask mandate was in place for individuals when in indoor public spaces, and when within 6 feet of non-household members for 15 minutes or longer. Gov. Kim Reynolds lifted the mandate, effective Feb. 7, encouraging vulnerable populations to “continue to limit their activities outside of their home.” On May 20, Reynolds signed a law banning mask mandates in counties, cities and schools throughout the state, disallowing local leaders from imposing mask requirements.

Kansas: No State Mandate

Since July 3, 2020, a statewide face-covering mandate has been in place for individuals throughout the state when in indoor public spaces, using public transportation, and outdoors when unable to maintain a 6-foot distance from non-household members. On April 1, Republican lawmakers in Kansas ended the mandate, following an executive order from Gov. Laura Kelly to keep the mandate in place.

Kentucky: No State Mandate

Gov. Andy Beshear initiated a face-covering mandate beginning July 10, 2020, making face coverings required while using public transportation, in all businesses and when a distance of 6 feet is difficult to maintain in all public indoor and outdoor spaces. Children 5 years and younger are exempt from the mandate, along with individuals actively exercising at a gym while maintaining a 6-foot distance from others, and those with disabilities that may prevent them from safely wearing a face covering. Beshear announced that starting April 27, groups of fewer than 1,000 individuals can gather outdoors without masks, although those who are not vaccinated should continue wearing masks if a 6-foot distance cannot be maintained from others. And on May 6, the governor announced that people who are vaccinated may gather in small groups indoors without masks. Following the CDC’s indoor mask recommendations for vaccinated individuals, Beshear announced that the state would immediately follow the new guidance, allowing those who are vaccinated to forgo mask requirements indoors. On June 11, the state’s mask mandate was lifted. On Aug. 10, Beshear announced that masks would be required inside schools, regardless of vaccination status.

Louisiana: State Mandate in Place

Since July 13, 2020, individuals in the state had been required to wear masks while in public settings. Gov. John Bel Edwards announced that starting April 28, the statewide mask mandate will lift, and mandates going forward will be set by local leaders and business owners. However, masks will still be required in government buildings, early childhood education centers and K-12 schools, at colleges and universities, public transportation and health care settings. Edwards reinstated the mask mandate on a temporary basis, effective Aug. 4, 2021, requiring individuals ages 5 and older to wear a mask in indoor public spaces.

Maine: No State Mandate

Gov. Janet Mills initiated a face-covering mandate effective April 29, 2020, requiring individuals throughout the state to wear a face covering in public settings. Effective Dec. 11, it was updated with more specific language about enforcement of the mandate, which should be carried out by owners and operators of all indoor public spaces. With the update, Mills clarified that claiming a medical exemption is not an excuse for declining to wear a face mask in an indoor public space. On April 27, 2021, Mills announced that masks would no longer be required outdoors in the state, except for where it is difficult to maintain physical distancing, following the CDC’s announcement of its new guidelines. The state’s mask mandate was lifted on May 24, although children ages 5 and older are still required to wear masks in school and child care settings.

Maryland: No State Mandate

Since April 15, 2020, Marylanders have been required to wear face coverings in the state while using public transportation and at retail establishments, an order that was updated to include mask requirements while indoors at any public location and outdoors when physical-distancing measures are not consistently possible from non-household members. Exceptions are in place for children 5 years and under, and for individuals with certain medical conditions. Gov. Larry Hogan lifted the outdoor mask mandate on April 28, 2021, although unvaccinated individuals are strongly encouraged to continue to wear masks, especially when social distancing is not possible. The statewide mask mandate ended on May 15, after the CDC announced new guidance allowing those who are fully vaccinated to go without masks indoors, although those who are not vaccinated are strongly encouraged to continue wearing face coverings, according to Maryland health officials.

Massachusetts: No State Mandate

Gov. Charlie Baker put a face-covering mandate in place effective May 6, 2020, ordering that individuals in the state wear a face covering when in a public location and when unable to maintain a distance of 6 feet from a non-household member. It was later updated to stipulate that masks must be worn at all times in public spaces. Exceptions apply for children 5 years of age and younger, and for individuals with certain medical conditions. Baker announced that the state’s mask mandate would be relaxed for some outdoor settings, effective April 30, 2021, except for when it is not possible to socially distance, following the CDC’s recommendations. On May 29, the state’s mask mandate ended, although face coverings will still be required on public transportation, in schools and health care settings, as well as in some congregate care settings. Those who are not vaccinated are advised to continue wearing face coverings.

Michigan: No State Mandate

After Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s mask mandate was challenged in court, the Michigan Health Department stepped in, requiring Michiganders to wear face coverings in indoor, public spaces and crowded outdoor spaces, effective Oct. 5, 2020. Starting April 26, 2021, amid a surge in coronavirus cases in the state, children ages 2-4 were required to wear a face covering, while they were previously exempt. Those with certain medical conditions were also exempted from the mandate. Beginning May 6, masks were no longer required at outdoor gatherings with fewer than 100 people, the state’s department of health announced, and people who are vaccinated were not required to wear masks at residential gatherings, whether indoors or outdoors. On May 15, Whitmer announced that the state would align with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are fully vaccinated to go without a mask in most indoor settings. On June 22, the state’s mask mandate ended.

Minnesota: No State Mandate

Gov. Tim Walz mandated starting July 25, 2020, that individuals in the state must wear a face covering in all indoor businesses and public settings, strongly encouraging Minnesotans to have a face covering with them at all times when leaving home. Exceptions to the mask mandate are made for children 5 years of age and younger, and individuals with certain medical conditions. Walz announced that on May 7, masks are no longer required in outdoor spaces, except for large venues of more than 500 people. The governor also announced that the state’s mask mandate will end by July 1. On May 13, after the CDC announced new recommendations for those who are vaccinated, Walz announced that the state’s mask mandate would come to an end May 14, although those who are not vaccinated are encouraged to continue wearing masks.

Mississippi: No State Mandate

After a statewide mask mandate expired in October 2020, Gov. Tate Reeves imposed mandates on a county basis. But starting on March 3, mask mandates will be lifted in all Mississippi counties. Individuals are still encouraged to wear face coverings, Reeves said, but are not ordered to do so.

Missouri: No State Mandate

Some cities have adopted mask mandates in the state, but a statewide mandate is not in place. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services advises individuals to wear face coverings outside of the home when social distancing is not possible.

Montana: No State Mandate

Then-Gov. Steve Bullock initiated a face-covering mandate July 15, 2020, for individuals in some indoor public spaces. But Gov. Greg Gianforte, who took office in January with a promise to remove the mask requirement, let the mandate expire on Feb. 12, encouraging personal responsibility as the state continues to face the COVID-19 pandemic. In May, Gianforte signed legislation invalidating local mask mandates.

Nebraska: No State Mandate

Masks were required for some employees at businesses where customers come in close contact, such as massage parlors and barbershops, but no statewide mandate exists. Some cities, such as Omaha, had more stringent face covering requirements, which have since expired.

Nevada: State Mandate in Place

Starting June 25, 2020, individuals in the state were required to wear a face-covering in any public space. New restrictions were put in place on Nov. 22, mandating that face covering must be worn when there is any contact with a non-household member, including private gatherings, whether inside or outside. On May 3, 2021, Gov. Steve Sisolak announced that those who are vaccinated may gather indoors with others who are fully vaccinated without masks and may participate in some outdoor activities without a mask as well, following CDC guidelines for vaccinated individuals. On May 13, Sisolak announced that the state would likewise follow the CDC’s guidelines for vaccinated individuals indoors, eliminating mask requirements for those who are vaccinated in most indoor settings. The state on July 27 announced a new mask mandate, in line with CDC guidance, making masks mandatory in indoor public spaces in counties with high COVID-19 transmission rates for both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals, effective July 30.

New Hampshire: No State Mandate

Gov. Chris Sununu announced a mask mandate beginning Nov. 20, 2020, for individuals in any public space, indoor or outdoor, where consistently maintaining physical-distancing measures is not possible. On April 16, 2021, the governor let the mandate expire, citing declining fatalities and increased vaccinations.

New Jersey: No State Mandate

New Jersey’s indoor mask mandate has been in place since April 2020. Effective July 8, 2020, individuals in the state were required to wear a mask in outdoor spaces where physical-distancing measures were not possible. On May 17, 2021, Gov. Phil Murphy lifted the state’s outdoor mask mandate. On May 28, the state’s indoor mask mandate was lifted, although masks are still required while using public transportation, in health care settings, long-term care facilities and child care settings, among others.

New Mexico: State Mandate in Place

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham initiated a face-covering mandate, effective May 16, 2020, ordering individuals in the state to wear a face covering when in public spaces. In July, restrictions were extended to gyms, as well, and a fine was put in place for violations of the mandate. On May 14, 2021, the state aligned its mask mandate with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are fully vaccinated to go without masks in most indoor and outdoor settings.

New York: State Mandate in Place

Since April 17, 2020, a face-covering mandate has been in place in the state in all public spaces when unable to maintain physical-distancing measures, such as using public transportation. The order makes exceptions for children under age 2 and individuals who cannot medically tolerate a face covering. Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced new mask-mandate guidelines, in accordance with the CDC’s recommendations, allowing vaccinated individuals to not wear masks in some outdoor settings, and effective May 19, 2021, those who are vaccinated may forgo wearing a mask in most settings, including indoors.

North Carolina: No State Mandate

Gov. Roy Cooper announced Nov. 23, 2020, that individuals in the state must wear face coverings when in indoor or outdoor public spaces and around non-household members. Face coverings are now required in schools and when exercising at gyms, building on the state’s initial June mandate. The order makes exceptions for children under 5 years of age, and those with certain medical conditions. Cooper announced an executive order to lift the state’s outdoor mask mandate, effective April 30, 2021, although individuals are still encouraged to wear masks in crowded areas. On May 14, Cooper ended the state’s mask mandate, after the CDC’s latest guidance on mask requirements indoors for those who are vaccinated. Masks are still required in some locations, including in schools, health care settings and on public transportation.

North Dakota: No State Mandate

Between Nov. 14, 2020, and Jan. 18, 2021, individuals in the state were required to wear masks in all indoor public spaces and outdoors when physical-distancing measures were not possible. But Gov. Doug Burgum let the mandate expire in January, citing improved case numbers, while urging the public to maintain personal responsibility when it comes to combating the coronavirus. In April, the state legislature overruled the governor’s veto and banned mask mandate implementation by statewide elected officials or health officers.

Northern Mariana Islands: No Mandate

Wearing a mask in the territory is not mandated, but some businesses have independently required face coverings upon entering.

Ohio: No State Mandate

Gov. Mike DeWine initiated a face-covering mandate, effective July 23, 2020, requiring all individuals to wear a face covering at all indoor public spaces, including public transportation, as well as in outdoor public spaces when physical-distancing measures were not possible. On May 17, Ohio’s mask mandate aligned with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are vaccinated to forgo wearing masks in most indoor and outdoor settings. On June 2, the state’s mask mandate was lifted, although DeWine reminded those who are not vaccinated to continue wearing masks indoors.

Oklahoma: No State Mandate

Gov. Kevin Stitt has recommended mask-wearing but has not imposed a statewide mandate.

Oregon: State Mandate in Place

Since July 1, 2020, individuals throughout the state have been required to wear face coverings in public indoor spaces, and that was later expanded to outdoor spaces. The state’s most recent mandate orders masks to be worn at all times, besides in one’s residence or while eating or drinking. Children under the age of 5 are exempt, as are those with certain medical conditions. Effective April 29, 2021, individuals who are fully vaccinated no longer have to wear masks outdoors, except for in crowded areas or at large gatherings. Fully vaccinated individuals can also gather without masks at private residences indoors in small groups with others who are vaccinated, following CDC guidelines. On May 13, Gov. Kate Brown announced that the state would follow the CDC’s mask guidelines for those who are vaccinated, effective immediately, allowing vaccinated individuals to forgo wearing a mask in most indoor spaces. Brown announced that the state’s mask mandate will lift once 70% of eligible adults have received at least one vaccine dose statewide. On June 30, the state’s mask mandate was lifted. Brown announced that masks will once again be required in indoor public spaces starting Aug. 13, regardless of vaccination status.

Pennsylvania: No State Mandate

Secretary of Health Rachel Levine announced a new mask mandate Nov. 17, 2020, requiring individuals age 2 and up to wear masks wherever they gather indoors with non-household members, even if they practice physical distancing. On March 17, 2021, a change to the mandate went into effect, allowing people who have been vaccinated to gather without masks with others who have been vaccinated, and with individuals from a single household even if they have not been vaccinated, in accordance with CDC guidelines. On May 13, public health officers in the state announced that Pennsylvania would align with CDC recommendations, allowing those who are vaccinated to forgo mask requirements in most indoor spaces. On June 28, the state’s mask mandate was lifted.

Puerto Rico: Mask Mandate in Place

Face masks are required at all businesses and during all outdoor activities in the territory, following a June 29, 2020, executive order. Effective June 7, 2021, those who are vaccinated are not required to wear masks outdoors, or indoors if all individuals have been vaccinated.

Rhode Island: State Mandate in Place

Starting May 8, 2020, individuals throughout the state have been required to wear face coverings in all public spaces. Former-Gov. Gina Raimondo built upon that mandate in November, ordering face coverings to be worn at all times when a non-household member is present, including while outdoors. Exceptions are made for children under 2 years of age, and for those individuals with certain medical conditions. Gov. Dan McKee announced that the mandate will be relaxed starting May 7, 2021, maintaining mask requirements indoors but not outdoors where people can keep at least 3 feet of distance from others. On May 18, McKee aligned the state’s mask mandate with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are fully vaccinated to go without a mask in most indoor settings.

South Carolina: No State Mandate

Gov. Henry McMaster has previously urged local officials to impose mask mandates, but no statewide mandate exists. Since August 2020, however, individuals in the state were required to wear a face covering in government buildings, offices and facilities, but an executive order on March 5, 2021, lifted those restrictions. Some local governments had mask mandates in place, but a May 11 executive order made all such mandates tied to state emergency declarations invalid. McMaster’s May 11 executive order also gave parents the ability to opt their children out of wearing masks in schools.

South Dakota: No State Mandate

The state encourages individuals to wear masks, but Gov. Kristi Noem has not put a statewide mandate in place.

Tennessee: No State Mandate

Gov. Bill Lee has advised individuals to take personal responsibility when it comes to wearing face coverings in public, especially in indoor spaces and when social distancing is not possible, but no statewide mandate has been ordered. Multiple counties across the state had initiated mask mandates, but Lee signed an executive order in April that removed local authority on mask mandates.

Texas: No State Mandate

A mask mandate has been in place in the state since July 3, 2020, requiring individuals to wear a face covering in public indoor spaces, as well as in outdoor public spaces when physical-distancing measures were not possible. But on March 2, 2021, Gov. Greg Abbott said in a press conference that he will remove the mask mandate, effective March 10, along with other statewide COVID-19 restrictions, citing the lowest case numbers and hospitalizations the state has seen in months. In May, Abbott banned local governments, schools and health authorities from imposing mask mandates.

More information on COVID-19 in Texas

U.S. Virgin Islands: Mandate in Place

In July 2020, the commissioner of health ordered that face-covering be worn in the territory in public spaces, including workspaces, businesses, schools and public transportation. The mandate exempts children under the age of 2.

Utah: No State Mandate

Then-Gov. Gary Herbert announced a statewide mask mandate Nov. 9, 2020, after previously instituting mandates on the county level. The statewide order required all individuals in the state must wear face masks while in indoor public settings, as well as outdoors when coming within 6 feet of a non-household member. The mandate ended on April 10, 2021.

Vermont: No State Mandate

Since Aug. 1, 2020, individuals in the state have been required to wear a face covering while in indoor or outdoor public spaces where they come in contact with non-household members and where they are unable to maintain a distance of 6 feet. The mandate makes exceptions for children 2 years of age and younger and those with certain medical conditions. Effective May 1, 2021, individuals are no longer required to wear masks outdoors, except for in crowded spaces where physical distancing is not possible. Effective May 15, those who are fully vaccinated may forgo wearing masks indoors as well. On June 14, Gov. Phil Scott announced an end to the mask mandate and all other COVID-19 restrictions, as 80% of eligible individuals in the state had received at least one dose of a vaccine.

Virginia: State Mandate in Place

Gov. Ralph Northam initiated a statewide face-covering mandate May 29, 2020, ordering individuals throughout the state to wear face coverings when in indoor public spaces and while using public transportation. Effective Dec. 14, Northam expanded the mandate to include all indoor areas shared with non-household members, and outdoor areas where maintaining a 6-foot distance from non-household members is not possible. The mandate exempts children under 5 years old. On May 14, 2021, Northam aligned the state’s mask mandate with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are fully vaccinated to go without a mask in most indoor and outdoor settings.

Washington: State Mandate in Place

Effective June 26, 2020, individuals in the state have been required to wear face coverings when in indoor public spaces, and in outdoor public spaces when maintaining a 6-foot distance from others is not possible. Children under 5 years of age are exempt from the mandate, along with individuals with certain medical conditions. Gov. Jay Inslee on May 13, 2021, announced that the state would align with the CDC’s recommendations allowing those who are vaccinated to go without a mask in most indoor and outdoor settings.

West Virginia: No State Mandate

Gov. Jim Justice initiated a face-covering mandate, effective Nov. 14, 2020, ordering all individuals in the state to wear face coverings when in indoor public spaces, with exceptions while eating and drinking inside restaurants. Children under 9 years of age are exempt from the regulation, as are individuals with certain medical conditions. Justice announced on May 7, 2021, that the state’s mask mandate will be lifted June 20. On May 14, Justice aligned the state’s mask mandate with the CDC’s latest guidance, allowing those who are fully vaccinated to forgo a mask in most indoor settings. On June 20, the mandate was lifted.

Wisconsin: No State Mandate

Following a legal challenge in October 2020, Gov. Tony Evers’ face-covering mandate was upheld. The mandate required individuals throughout the state to wear face coverings in indoor public spaces, as well as enclosed spaces such as while using public transportation. On March 31, 2021, however, after disputes between the governor and some legislators brought the mandate to the state’s Supreme Court, the mandate was struck down and effectively ended.

Wyoming: No State Mandate

A statewide mask order took effect on Dec. 9, 2020, requiring face coverings be worn in indoor public spaces, such as businesses, government buildings, and while using public transportation. But Gov. Mark Gordon announced that he will remove the mask mandate, effective March 16, 2021, asking Wyoming citizens to “continue to take personal responsibility for their actions and stay diligent.”

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